JMHSK - Dedicated to helping those who suffer from hemophilia

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FAQ - Children

Frequently Asked Questions & Facts - Children

Should I tell my friends that I have Hemophilia?
That's something you might want to talk to your parents about or your Treatment Centre, but it is your choice. Sometimes the best explanation is for you to tell them, but you could also ask the nurse from your Treatment Centre to go to the school and talk to your teachers and/or the kids in your class.

Can I go on school camp?
Yes. When your teachers are planning the camp or any excursions they will speak to your parents about any help you might need while you are away. Before you go away your Hemophilia Centre can write to the nearest hospital or GP in the area that you are going to, to explain what care you might need while you are there. You can take your treatment product and sterile supplies with you and the GP or a doctor at the hospital can give you your treatment or contact your Hemophilia Centre if they have any queries. Sometimes your mum and dad might come on the camp to help out as one of the parent helpers.

What is a "port"?
A port or infusaport is a special device that is put under the skin on your chest. It has a tube that goes into one of your big veins in the neck. You can use this port for your treatment instead of seeking out a new vein in your arm. You need a small operation to have the port put in.

Does it hurt when you use the port?
No. When you have your treatment through your port we put "magic cream" or special numbing cream on the skin that is over the port so you don't feel the needle. Sometimes you can feel a little pushing when the needle goes in, but that doesn't hurt.

Can I play football?
Yes, you can play non-contact football. It is good to learn skills and how to play safely. Talk to your Hemophilia Centre about it.

What happens if I have a bleed when I have exams at school? 
Usually schools are very helpful about rescheduling exams if medically necessary. They will probably need a letter from your doctor and an estimated time as to when you will be back at school. In the senior years at high school you can apply for consideration of disadvantage in advance so that, should you need it, arrangements are made on your behalf.

 

About Us


The purpose of the society is to provide service and support to persons with hemophilia or other clotting disorders and their families. Read more

Our Programs


JMHSK runs a number of programs aimed at education; support and offering affordable medical help to those living with hemophilia. Read More

 

Annual Events


17th April: We celebrate World Hemophilia Day

25th April: Family Day as it marks Jose Memorial Day

How you can help


We rely on the generous support of individuals and groups to provide services, education and support for people living with hemophilia and other bleeding disorders. Read More

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Team Our Team

 

Our Vision

Healthy, active and empowered citizens living with Hemophilia

 

Our Mission

To provide comprehensive care, medical support and service to people with Hemophilia through registration, provision of treatment, education and training.

 

Our Programs

Medical Programs


One of the Society’s ultimate goals is to provide comprehensive care meaning that along with factor replacement therapy, patients receive physiotherapy, dental hygiene, genetic counselling, diagnostics, psychosocial therapy, orthopedics and surgical care. 

Organizational Programs


The society was launched on 17th April 2009 during the World Hemophilia Day (WHD) at the MP Shah Hospital to give it credibility and to create awareness on a wider scale. The media was present at the launch in an effort to inform the public of the presence and purpose of the society.

Family Programs


In Kenya, the pressure to provide basic medical care leaves families on the sidelines. Many families are reluctant and afraid to assert their needs and have thus learnt to be helpless and hopeless, and suffer in silence.

Government Lobbying


The society cannot achieve its vision of comprehensive Hemophilia care without the government’s support. Hemophilia is rare and the government faces other urgent medical needs thus our case can get lost in the many voices crying for government attention.

 

Fund Raising & Public Awareness

 

 

As public awareness on the society is raised, more people will contribute to its success. The society will endeavor to run both of these concurrently to ensure success as they are intimately related. We undertake to identify the stakeholders listed below and create linkages.

Funding source include:

  1. The government
  2. Private Individuals
  3. Corporations and Businesses
  4. The General Public

 

 

 

Useful Links

© 2018 Jose Memorial Hemophilia Society. All Rights Reserved.

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